Saturday, 24 September 2022

Cardinal Collins shut down the Mass for you but wants $30,000,000.00 of your money for pagan "Indigenous spirituality!"

 


The Archdiocese of Toronto will hold a special collection next weekend, October 1/2, to support the Indigenous Healing & Reconciliation Fund. Catholics throughout the Archdiocese of Toronto are invited to participate in this collection. The collection is a national grassroots effort to assist healing and reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples of This Land. The fund was the result of a $30 million financial commitment made by the Canadian Bishops in September 2021. 

Funds will support culture and language revitalization, education and community building, healing and reconciliation for communities and families and dialogue involving Indigenous elders, spiritual leaders and youth with a focus on Indigenous spirituality and culture. This is an opportunity to follow the invitation of the Holy Father made earlier this year for each one of us to become engaged in the healing and reconciliation journey.

For more information or to donate online, visit: www.archtoronto.org/healingandreconciliation

That there is generational suffering amongst many of the indigenous peoples of Canada is undeniable. This has been a result of government policy, the tearing up of the same treaties, the perversion and corruption of chiefs and so much more. Is there clean water even yet in Attawapiskat? Over a century ago, the Government of Canada developed a policy of integration and assimilation. On one hand, there were good reasons for this, including full participation of native peoples in social and economic society. On the other, the national interest of resource development, railroads and Eastern European wheat farmers necessitating getting them off their historic land to make room. It is a complicated issue. I have written previously that, in my view, the great error of the Catholics of the day, mainly religious orders, was to work hand in hand with the government in an action against the interests of the people and of truth (as with the shut down of churches over the flu). 

In two days, we will recall the Feast of the Canadian Martyrs who, while three centuries earlier, lived amongst the people and preached Christ and salvation. Those Orders and Bishops should have used St. Jean de Brebeuf and St. Isaac Jogues and companions as examples, not partnering with the secular state. Yes, we will go to their teepees and long houses and we will educate them and guide them, but we won't take them from their homes." This is what the response should have been. The question of residential school graveyards is an opportunity for anti-catholic hatred and bigotry. Yes, there are graves. Children died of diseases, influenza, diphtheria, meningitis, and measles. Maybe some were abused. A tragedy, but these are not mass graves as we understand them from Hitler or Pol Pot or Stalin.

To return to the statement above, Toronto Catholics and others in Canada are being asked to fund $30,000,000.00 in "dialogue involving Indigenous elders, spiritual leaders and youth with a focus on Indigenous spirituality and culture." What does this mean? A return to their pagan routes? The grandmothers of the four winds or whatever other pagan practices have been reborn amongst the current generation of indigenous witch doctors? They shut you out of the church and now expect you to pay for their errors while they affirm these people in pagan idolatry and deny Jesus Christ.

Not one penny. 

2 comments:

Unknown said...

American TV and movies depicted Indians as half naked, painted savages, murdering the pioneers and cavalry soldiers. Screaming and scalping them - I watched this in the '50s. Yet they get a pass.
Joanie

Robert said...

To be honest, I am confused by this 30,000,000$ national collection. I mean, having gone through all the bother of wiggling out of the original 25,000,000$ agreement; even getting the federal government to pay all the legal bills, it really makes no sense to turn around and ask for an even larger amount from the faithful.
Do the people of the First Nations deserve some sort of compensation for the damage caused by the various church communities: yes! It is not enough for the church leaders to do a collective breast beating with mea culpas.
Sorry for the rant.

Robert